Bioimaging across scales

Built up around your sample, LUXENDO’s microscopes are adapted to match your experimental needs. Find the most appropriate system for your application to ensure best-in-class 3D images.

Applications

Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has become the method of choice for non-invasive imaging of a variety of live and cleared biological samples ranging from subcellular structures to cells, tissues and whole embryos, e.g. Drosophila and Zebrafish.

Among other features, the significantly reduced photodamage effects and the very high acquisition speed make light-sheet fluorescence microscopy stand out.

The MuVi SPIM, the InVi SPIM, and the QuVi SPIM systems, as well as the solutions for cleared sample imaging and photomanipulation, have been built up around your sample to meet the requirements of your application. Take a look at the different examples.

Embryogenesis & Developmental Biology

Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy enables the observation of events in real time for several days.

The MuVi SPIM was conceived for gentle, large specimen imaging. It features four orthogonal views of the sample without the need for rotation. The low magnification, high NA objective lenses enable fast, high-resolution, large field-of-view imaging of entire embryos as well as tissue and organ development tracking.

Drosophila Embryo Development

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    Transgenic line expressing His2Av-mCherry as fluorescent nuclear reporter. The fruit fly embryo was imaged for almost one complete day (4 × 200 slices every 30 seconds).

    Courtesy of:
    Lars Hufnagel
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
    Heidelberg, Germany

Drosophila Egg chambers

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    Drosophila ovariole stained with phalloidin to label actin (red) found along membranes and in the germline ring canals, DAPI (blue) to show the nuclei and a somatic ring canal marker (green) to label the ring canals in the epithelium.

    Courtesy of:
    Jasmin Imran Alsous
    Schvartsman Lab
    Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA

Drosophila Embryo

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    Drosophila embryo expressing H2A-mCherry and MS2-GFP.

    Courtesy of:
    Jared Toettcher
    Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA

Vascular Development in Zebrafish

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    From left to right: the video shows a beating Zebrafish heart imaged at 50 frames/sec, followed by Zebrafish blood vessels (magenta) and red blood cells (yellow) and Zebrafish blood flow imaged at 50 frames/sec.

    Courtesy of:
    Nadia Mercader & Inés Marques
    University of Bern
    Bern, Switzerland

Zebrafish Embryonic Development

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    Zebrafish embryo expressing Histone H2A-GFP imaged every 6 min from late gastrula to 15–17 somite stage.

    Courtesy of:
    Andres Collazo
    Caltech, Pasadena, CA, USA
    as well as: Course faculty and participants of the 2017 Zebrafish Course
    Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL)
    Woods Hole, MA, USA

Organoids Research

Organoid research has been established as an essential tool for studies in cancer research, drug discovery and regenerative medicine.

The InVi SPIM singles out in the gentle handling of the most delicate samples and the minimization of required specimen medium. This is achieved by the incubation capacities and the V-shaped sample chamber. If high-throughput is also desirable, the QuVi SPIM may be the system of your choice.

Colonies of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Colonies of mouse embryonic stem cells stably expressing H2B-mCherry and IRFP670 with a membrane-targeting signal.

    Courtesy of:
    Pierre Neveu
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
    Heidelberg, Germany

Fixed Astrocyte Spheroid

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    Spheroid stained with anti-GFAP (Alexa 488) to label astrocytes and anti-Neurofilament200 (Alexa555) to label neurons.

    Courtesy of:
    Markus Bruell
    AG Leist, University of Konstanz
    Konstanz, Germany

Plant Research

The application of light-sheet fluorescence microscopy for plant research has allowed in vivo studies of plant cell and tissue biology.

In combination with other approaches, imaging of cell morphology, migration and organization, as well as tissue structure enable a better understanding of function and dynamics. The MuVi SPIM, but also the InVi SPIM provide the relevant tools for the research on the field.

Arabidopsis Root Growth

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    Transgenic Arabidopsis root expressing nuclear envelope marker, imaged with the MuVi SPIM. The comparison of the videos shows the effect of gravity on root growth.

    Courtesy of:
    Shanjin Huang
    Tsinghua University
    Beijing, China

Microalgae

Arabidopsis root

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    Transgenic Arabidopsis root expressing a membrane marker. Imaged with the InVi SPIM.

    Courtesy of:
    Alexis Maizel
    COS, University of Heidelberg
    Heidelberg, Germany

Cell culture

Light-sheet microscopy applied to cell culture imaging reduces negative effects on cell behavior and development.

The InVi SPIM enables gentle handling of the most delicate samples and the use of small volumes of mounting media. In addition, precise control of CO2, O2, temperature and humidity provides close-to-natural conditions to the sample. The QuVi SPIM would further bring high-throughput imaging capabilities due to compatibility with SBS plates.

HeLa Cell Culture

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    HeLa cells expressing GFP and mCherry.

    Courtesy of:
    Tobias A. Knoch
    Erasmus MC
    Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Mouse Pre-Implantation Development

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    Left: Mouse pre-implantation embryos expressing H2B-mCherry. Nuclei tracking from one-cell stage to blastocyst.

    Right: Mouse oocytes expressing CENPC-EGFP and H2B-mCherry for kinetochore tracking.

    Petr Strnad, et al. (2016). Inverted light-sheet microscope for imaging mouse pre-implantation development. Nature Methods 13, 139-145

Neurobiology & NeuroDevelopment

Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has enabled imaging of the central nervous system including large networks of neurons, and even whole cleared brains (e.g. mouse).

Both the MuVi SPIM LS and the InVi SPIM are suited for in-vivo imaging of nervous system development in small embryos like Drosophila and Zebrafish, while the MuVi SPIM CS was conceived to image large cleared samples.

Zebrafish Eye

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    Zebrafish eye imaged on the MuVi SPIM

    Courtesy of:
    Anja Machate and Michael Brand
    Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD), TU Dresden
    Dresden, Germany

Newborn Mouse Cochlea

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    Hair cells stained for GFP in a newborn mouse cochlea. Imaged at a magnification of 62.5x.

    Courtesy of:
    Raphael Etournay
    Genetics and Physiology of Hearing, Institut Pasteur
    Paris, France

Cleared-Sample Imaging

Clearing tissue techniques modify the optical properties of usually opaque samples to render them transparent while keeping their structure intact.

The MuVi SPIM CS provides innovative solutions in sample mounting, sample size and optics for best-in-class 3D imaging of cleared samples.

Cleared Mouse Head

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    Labeled with anti-tuj1 (green) to mark developing nerves and with anti-desmin (red) to mark differentiating muscles. Tiled image (6 × 5).

    Courtesy of:
    Glenda Comai
    Institut Pasteur
    Paris, France

Neuronal Network

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    Neuronal network (stained with GFP) of a CUBIC-cleared mouse brain

    Color-coded depth representation: maximal depth displayed 1.23 mm

    Courtesy of:
    Montserrat Coll Lladó
    European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)
    Barcelona, Spain

Cleared Mouse Lymph Node

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    Cleared mouse lymph node. High endothelial venules (642 nm, red) and autofluorescence (488 nm, green) to visualize surrounding tissue.

    Courtesy of:
    Jens Stein
    University of Bern
    Bern, Switzerland

Other

Many other applications can benefit from the advantages of imaging with light-sheet microscopy, e.g. marine biology.

Take a look at the different systems, the MuVi SPIM CS, the InVi SPIM or the QuVi SPIM, and select the one that best fits your sample needs.

Daphnia Magna

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    Auto-fluorescence in Daphnia imaged on the MuVi SPIM.

    Courtesy of:
    Ellen Decaestecker and Luc De Meester
    KU Leuven
    Kortrijk, Belgium

Annelid Embryo

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    Platynereis dumerilii (annelid) in embryonic stage. Stained for EMTB, a microtubule associated protein. Color-coded depth representation.

    Courtesy of:
    Hella Hartmann, Mette Handberg-Thorsager, Pavel Tomancak and Yu-Wen Hsieh
    TU Dresden and Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG)
    Dresden, Germany

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